Friday, January 25, 2013

Becoming literate


I ordered the book above from Amazon and it arrived late last week.  On Tuesday of this week, I finally was able to sit down and crack it open, and boy, what a difference it has made!  Several times, I'd had people show me a staff and try to explain the "Every Good Boy Does Fine" and "FACE" but they left out the rather important detail about where those notes are found on the staff.  I am embarrassed to admit that I never "got" that the EGBDF are notes ON THE LINES and that the FACE was describing those notes BETWEEN the lines on the staff.  Duh.  See, it's all in the minute details that people assume you know.  I shook my head and laughed out loud when the light went on.

Marc Shonbrun has created a very wonderful book written with simple detail and explanation and I am finally not feeling so lost and confused in learning this language of music.  And, it is a language, with it's own words and symbols that you have to take the time to learn in order to understand it.  He also includes a CD with examples of different rhythms and such so you can actually hear it and follow along in the book.  Brilliant!  Each one is done with a snare drum along with a metronome so you can count as well as hear the placement of the notes.  There is hope for me yet!  I have faced my fear and I am grinning.

8 comments:

troutbirder said...

Good news indeed, Jayne. Somehow I was a little puzzled by your struggles with this subject. Then it dawned on me. My seven years of youthful piano lessons (at my mothers insistence) may actually have done me some good. I could read music and type like a whiz. My baseball and football career suffered though....:)

Jayne said...

Yes indeed my friend, it was that much of a struggle as I've never had any sort of musical instrument exposure and so it really was Greek to me! :c)

KGMom said...

Interesting that someone such as you--a choir member and some time soloist--should have felt musically illiterate.
I can sight-read but mostly due to knowing how to pitch the intervals between notes. So if I get the first note, I can then sing the remainder, mostly.
As for sight-reading for piano--forget it. I took lessons and relied far too much on my ear. I don't have a perfect musical memory, but can pick up a tune fairly quickly...which made me too lazy to learn to sight-read.

Deb said...

I often take the ability to read music for granted, but then again I have been playing one instrument or another since I was very young. It must be like learning a new language for you- congratulations for taking on the challenge of learning it! I still have a lot to learn, like how to recognize chords that aren't a major, minor, or 7th.

Laurie said...

I remember from choir class, the notes. Our teacher would make sentences out of the notes, and we'd have to look at the note and write it. Then we'd have a sentence. Like:
a bad egg. Or she'd put in the notes and we had to write what word they spelled. It really helped me to learn the notes. Your book sounds perfect Jayne, have fun!

NCmountainwoman said...

What a great find. So often people forget that not everyone sat through piano lessons. Glad it makes sense.

Beth said...

Yay for you, my friend! I'm so glad you found a book that's helpful---looks like a great choice.

altar ego said...

I knew that with the right tool(s) you would tackle this with aplomb. Good for you! In spite of being able to read music to play the piano and recorder, when it comes to singing I learn best by hearing. I can't really sight read very well, and have never had any instruction in it. Bravo to you!